LIFE: A PARADOX CONUNDRUM (1)

Life is full of paradoxes that  some say require balancing; however accepting an appropriate location on the paradox continuum,  when dealing with the paradox conundrum, may be as good as it gets! An example of such a paradox follows:

  • Receiving makes You feel Good
  • Giving makes You feel Great

In one’s personal or professional life; it is important to be able to receive and give thanks, and at the same time have the generosity of heart to give without expecting anything in return. Interestingly this giving, in addition to making one feel better, is likely to result in more receiving.

Always try to be on the giving end of this paradox continuum and paradoxically, over time, you will find yourself moving closer to the receiving end.

  • Help Others to Help Yourself

LIFE: A PARADOXICAL CONUNDRUM

Life is full of paradoxes, that  some say require require balancing; however settling on an appropriate location on the paradox continuum,  when dealing with the paradox conundrum, may be as good as it gets!

Examples of such paradoxes include: committing oneself to the pursuit of perfection even though perfection is impossible, exerting the self-confidence necessary to succeed whilst balancing this with humility,  being eager but patient, being trustful but checking ahead of time nonetheless…

John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton described paradoxes beautifully when he stated, “When you perceive a truth, look for the balancing truth.”

Over  the next months I will expand on a number of life’s paradoxes. Please feel free to add your own as a comment.

 

DISCIPLINE AND MARSHMALLOWS

In the late 60/early 70, Dr. Walter Mischel carried out an experiment with children to examine discipline and success later in life. The children in the experiment were seated in a large room with one marshmallow on their desk. They were told that when the adults left the room they could either eat the marshmallow or alternatively if they waited until the adults returned they could have two marshmallows to eat. The children were then followed for four decades and were assessed in terms of their success. It was found that those children who were more disciplined and waited until the adults returned were more successful in life. Dr. Mischel concluded over time that those children who were more disciplined were not born lucky with the “discipline gene” but rather they had employed learned skills to avoid the Marshmallow Temptation. This conclusion expands beyond Marshmallows to all  the Temptations we face in life that hold us back.

Oscar Wilde was witty when he said ” I can resist anything except temptation” , but in reality, “We can resist all temptations if we have the appropriate learned skills”